Share Three Somethings – October

Yes, I know the format for this post is supposed to include four somethings. I will explain later why I only have three to share this month (and maybe for several months to come).

Something Loved

 

My oldest grandson is currently attending school  in-person two days a week because of restrictions due to the pandemic. Three days a week, his learning is virtual.

My son (his father) is in charge of monitoring the virtual learning. He, of course, has work obligations and other duties around the house that prevent him from giving his full attention to my grandson for hours each day.

I, on the other hand, have very few obligations and, ahem, some experience with education. I happily volunteered to help my grandson with his virtual learning.

I think the experience was good for both of us. We got the work done in a timely fashion, there were no shouting matches or hurt feelings, and we even had fun with some of the work.

I did need to call in some expert advice for the science lesson, however. My area of expertise is chemistry. When a biology question had me stumped, I admit it – I texted one of my biology-teacher friends for some guidance.

I loved the feeling of helping an exceptional student to learn. I hope I still have the opportunity to help when some chemistry questions arise.

Something Read

I don’t remember who recommended this book to me, but whoever you were, thank you!

In The Ministry of Ordinary Places, Shannan Martin writes about her life and the lessons she has learned along the way.

She is not living the idyllic rural life she once imagined; she now lives in a gritty urban setting. Here she realized that the richness of life comes not from one’s surroundings, but from opening your heart to others. By opening her eyes and committing herself to reflect God’s love to those whose lives intersect hers, she found goodness all around.

Ms. Martin makes a point of reminding herself and her readers to show up and pay attention, a prompt I most certainly need. 

The author intertwines compelling personal stories with profound lessons. One spare, beautiful sentence has kept me pondering for weeks: “The death of self is marked with scars.

I will definitely search for more books by this gifted author.

Something Treasured

 

In Colorado, the first Monday in October is officially Cabrini Day, the first state holiday which honors a woman.

Mother Frances Xavier Cabrini., canonized in 1946, was a U.S. citizen who helped to found the Institute of the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. These devout and diligent sisters founded schools and orphanages in New York City in the early 1900s, rescuing children from dire poverty and chaos.

She had a special fondness, however, for the foothills west of Denver, Colorado, where a shrine exists to honor and remember her.

My Colorado son and grandson, having the day off school and work, decided to honor Mother Cabrini by spending the day outside in nature. They went fishing.

My father, who never got to meet my grandchildren, was an avid fly fisherman who loved to visit Colorado and fish in the Yampa River for rainbow and brown trout. He would have approved wholeheartedly with his grandson’s and great-grandson’s decision to spend the day fishing.

My grandson caught his first trout, which he and his dad ate for lunch, along with some potatoes from their garden.

I think it will become a Cabrini Day tradition.

Something Ahead

So, this is the section of the post I am struggling with. The phrase “We make plans, and God laughs,” has never been more apt than during this pandemic.

Who really knows what is ahead at any given point in time, but especially now.

I think, at least for this month, I am going to leave this part of the post unfinished, spend my time just enjoying the “now“, and not look too far ahead.

Maybe next month, I will feel differently.

 

You can find the places I link up here.

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86 comments

  1. Great post, I love that you can use your teaching wisdom with your grandson 👍 Yes, maybe next month you will feel differently. No idea what Christmas will be like for all of us this year but it is coming 🤔

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Laurie, I loved your three somethings. I haven’t heard of this book by Shannan Martin, but that quote makes me want to go and get it. I hope you’ve made many wonderful memories with your family during your time in Colorado. And, I completely understand not wanting to comment on what’s ahead. With all the unknowns, it’s difficult to say!

    Have a great rest of your week, my friend.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. A very heartwarming post, Laurie — and I think you are wise to not look too far ahead right now. Best to marshall our energies, don’t you agree? And that phrase — “the death of self is marked with scars” — will stay with me!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I love the phrase “We make plans, and God laughs,” Laurie. Isn’t that so true, especially in these times? You know, in the last couple of weeks, I’ve begun to realize the blessings in this covid madness; I’ve focused more on God and much less on myself. Can that be a bad thing? Also, I’m so glad that you can help out with your grandson’s lessons. I’ve told my daughter that if she needs help with any of the girls’ lessons to simply let me know, and I’ll be the first to offer online help. Being eight hours away from one another certainly doesn’t provide for a one-on-on opportunity.
    Blessings, my friend!

    Liked by 1 person

    • It is SO true! Focusing on God more and yourself less is always a good thing. I am formulating now my word for the year next year. What you describe is very close to what I am thinking about. I hope you get a chance to help out with your granddaughters. It was fun for me!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I need to check out that book. Sounds similar to one of my favorites “Under the Overpass” – by a man who ministered to people that lived homeless under overpass expressways. It was so moving to me

    Liked by 1 person

  6. “The death of self is marked with scars.” Now you’ve got me thinking.

    It sounds like a thought-provoking book. I also like the idea of paying attention. My husband is better at it and often observes things that I completely overlooked.

    Thank you for the recommendation, Laurie!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. How fun to read about Mother Cabrini here! She has quite a story; my daughter and I learned a lot about her when we homeschooled for 5th & 6th grade. (I learned SO MUCH those two years.) What a meaningful way to step in and make a difference for your family by pitching in with the distance learning. As a parent, I don’t know if I can even express how much that would mean to me.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Ok, I love that line “We make plans and God laughs.” I’ve lost track of the number of times our plans have been redirected this year. It’s nice to know others feel the same way on this wild 2020 adventure. Thanks for sharing this!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Ha. Maybe you could start checking in with Eli a couple of afternoons per week. We had to call Susan’s sister over the weekend to get help in Algebra. All of us acting as teachers during the pandemic is showcasing our deficiencies in knowledge.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Oh, that’s so neat about the Cabrini celebration! Also, your grandson is lucky to have you assist with the home-schooling. What great bonding time 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  11. What a wonderful new tradition for your grandson! I had never heard of Mother Cabrini. So interesting.

    We had to take Lola to the ER vet this morning. Or rather, I did. She is ok (now), well maybe, mostly it’s old age but let’s just say first thing this morning was very scary and tears were shed & I’m not a cryer. So yes, sometimes it’s good not to plan so much.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. I have a high school friend who lives in North Carolina and she decided to retire a year or so ago, but found herself regretting her impulsive action and decided to apply for a substitute teaching position at the same school district she taught for 35 years. Her husband is still working, they have no kids and she got bored, so there she is. You, however, have kids, grandkids, plus travel (to look forward to) and running. I guess it was an easy decision for her. I’ve not heard of that book. We have a Cabrini High School in the area. I did not know the history behind the name, especially a saint and a woman.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I have friends who retired at the same time as me, who substitute teach. No way would I do that. I enjoyed the relationships I built over the course of the year with my students, but I wouldn’t get that with substituting. Plus, I just don’t want the responsibility anymore. I am definitely not bored!

      Liked by 1 person

      • I don’t blame you Laurie. I have another high school friend who was the head of a radiology department at a large hospital. Her husband is an attorney. She is 65 and he is 72 and still practicing law. She retired two years ago, now works at a doctor’s office for indigent women called “Pregnancy Aid Detroit” and does substitute teaching (general studies) for EDUstaff. Her daughter-in-law (husband was married before, Cherie had no kids) is a principal at an elementary school, so she was excited to get her foot in the door. Me, I’m like you – I feel I’ve earned my retirement and will be happy to enjoy it, also will not be bored.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yes she is – she is a giving person Laurie. It may have something to do that she was a nun before leaving the convent and becoming an elementary school teacher … I believe Ann Marie taught first grade. She retired at age 70.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. I love that you were able to fill the role of science tutor for your grandson, Laurie. I’ve got some plans laid out in my Something Ahead category, but after reading your thoughts, I think I need to remind myself quite often to hold those plans VERY loosely!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Great that you were able to step in and help with ‘home’ schooling,such a good relationship building time with your Grandson! I can identify with your ‘three’ somethings as I too left the ‘pages ahead blank’ but with anticipation – waiting to see what God has planned! November posts will be even more interesting 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  15. It’s so cool that you can help your grandson with his lessons. My kids had virtual lessons for almost two terms this year plus I had to work – let’s just say they would have done appreciated a grandma like you (who probably didn’t get stressed and cranky, lol). I understand your reluctance to look ahead too far. Restrictions have been tightened again over here in the UK and everything is just uncertain all over again.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Great! You must have your leisure time & write only 3 posts.
    You are very wise & I am sure your grandson is going to learn a lot from you. At his stage you will be able to answer questions in any subject.😃

    Liked by 1 person

  17. The best writing gets the reader involved and makes them think. Breaking tradition (3 instead of 4) and breaching number 3 without further explanation has given me much to think about. Scars and generational bonding are quite thought-provoking as well. Thanks again for sharing in a way that makes me think!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. I’m glad that you’re getting to spend time with your grandson. My kids also have a two days at school, three days at home schedule. It’s been an adjustment, but I’m glad that they get a little bit of in-person instruction and they’ve been pretty resilient.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. I enjoyed your three somethings, and I understand about not having a fourth. It is so hard to plan for anything right now! I’m glad you’re enjoying teaching your grandson, and the book you recommended sounds good!

    Liked by 1 person

  20. What a special treat – and blessing – to spend the time and work with your grandson with school! I know so many grandparents who would love that opportunity! (and plenty of parents who wish they were so blessed!)

    Liked by 1 person

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