Three Thoughts On the Golden Years

Meditations in Motion

I live with an old dog.

If the adage that every human year is like seven dog years is true, my dog Benji is 98. Or maybe 100.

He has some quirks.

He used to sleep wherever he wanted, now he sleeps in a large crate beside our bed. Some nights he gets up five, six, seven times, wanting to go outside, every 10 minutes for an hour or so.

My husband and I generally take turns letting him out, but the day following one of these episodes is often a tough one. I wake up cranky and tired, already worn out from interrupted sleep.

I try to be patient but I do admit to sometimes thinking less than generous thoughts about the old dog whose restlessness has caused me to trudge to the front door in the wee hours of the morning again.

But I do love him and so I trudge.

They know what it’s like to be your age. You don’t know what it’s like to be their age.

Meditations in Motion

I can remember thinking similar impatient thoughts about my mother.

Mom lived to be 90 years old. She had a stroke at 87, which affected her mental capabilities.

She lived her last three years in an assisted living facility near my house. I used to help her shower and get into bed every night.

Sometimes she would ask to go for a drive before bed, usually to see places she remembered from her childhood.

Occasionally, we would return from the drive, pull into a parking space at the facility, and she would request to be taken to the exact location we had just visited.

I would try to tell her, “Mom, we were just there“, but she needed to go again.

I would usually sigh, put the car in reverse, and drive to revisit the site we had seen 15 minutes before. For some reason, the first visit wasn’t satisfying. She needed confirmation that she had really seen what she thought she had seen.

I didn’t understand it, but then again,  I have never been 88.

She could put herself in my shoes. She cared for her elderly parents when they were ill. I couldn’t put myself in hers.

As we get older and have more experiences in our memory banks, compassion and empathy become easier.

You will slow down. And that’s a good thing.

Meditations in Motion

As we get older my husband and I vacillate between fighting against our slowing running paces and accepting them.

Actually, I fight, he accepts.

I know it’s a losing battle but I sometimes feel as though I should at least try to slow down the aging process.

I am a retired teacher. Before I retired, my typical school day looked like this: wake up at 4:30 so I could walk the dog and go to the gym before school. Run, swim, or take a class. Get to school by 6:45. Eat breakfast in my room, help students with projects before homeroom, teach a full day of classes, host open lab and individual instruction after school. After a 10-or-12-hour day, go home, cook dinner, eat dinner, pack breakfast, lunch, and a gym bag for the next morning, and grade papers until I fall asleep. Every day.

It was exhausting.

The slower life of retirement was a welcome respite.

Having time to write, to take a walk in the woods, to play with grandchildren, read, volunteer, to sit and daydream is a gift. An advantage of aging.

I was delighted to discover the slower pace of retirement life suits me just fine.

You will become invisible. And that’s a good thing too.

Meditations in Motion

I can remember getting stopped for going through a red light when I was in my twenties.

My mother had admonished me many times “Laurie, you will catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.

I used to wonder why I would want to catch flies in the first place, but in this instance, I did not want to get a ticket.

I turned on the charm. I smiled at the police officer. I may have batted my eyelashes.

It worked.

I got off with a warning.

If I tried to do that now, the police officer would probably think I was having a seizure.

I have become largely invisible to younger people. And that’s a good thing.

When we get to be a certain age, we can wear outlandish clothes if we please, laugh as loud as we want, worry less about the insignificant, and make others feel good about themselves.

There is a certain freedom to being able to move about unnoticed. We have the power to make things happen without worrying about our egos.

Invisibility has its advantages.

And, finally…

When my mom was in her early eighties, it became evident that taking care of the house and property where she and my dad had lived for over 50 years was becoming a burden.

She began looking for a new arrangement.

She visited some of her friends for lunch at their retirement community to determine whether it would be a good fit for her.

After her visit, I asked her what she thought – was this a place she wanted to live?

Sadly, Mom shook her head. “Laurie, I don’t want to live there. Those people are old.

It’s all a state of mind.

“Do not grow old, no matter how long you live. Never cease to stand like curious children before the great mystery into which we were born.” – Albert Einstein

 

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Please click on the following link to read more funny or inspirational one-liners. One-Liner Wednesday.

Meditations in Motion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

125 comments

  1. It’s a great reminder, thanks. My father, at 89 is still operating at pretty much 100% mentally and his personality really hasn’t changed at all. I haven’t needed to adapt with him. One thing I’ve notice though is that my patience in communicating with him (and pretty much everyone else) has expanded exponentially as *I’ve* aged. I often think back to my thirties and how impossible I must have been. I knew everything about everything.

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  2. Yes it is so true that we become invisible! Jerry Seinfeld has a very funny routine on seniors now that he is one himself. It is hilarious and spot on! Your Einstein quote is something I live by 🙂👍 Thanks for the lovely share.

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  3. What a touching and heartfelt post, Laurie. We all age, but getting old is a choice. Like you, I love being retired from teaching. When you recalled your former schedule here, did I ever feel the pain! Embracing retirement, taking one moment/day at a time, and loving that I’m free to be me. Blessings!

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    • We have an older dog as well but thankfully she is still sleeping throughout the night. It seems to be our younger ones that want out now at the odd hours. My Nana is 90 now and she is going strong, living by herself and still driving, although she does do some things that makes me think why would she do or say that? Then I remind myself that she is 90!

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      • Count your blessings if your old dog sleeps through the night. It’s almost as bad as having a baby! 🙂 Good for your Nana! 90 and going strong is wonderful.

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      • Our younger dog is delightfully daffy, and the older one (eight) is getting more cranky by the day, But still in good nick and loves her walks!! Fair play to your nan, still going so strong. She’s earned the right to be a bit “different”!

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  4. I am seeing the aging in my mom. She is going to be 97 in August. The last 3 years she has slowed down considerably but up until then she was driving herself around! I hope I am so lucky.

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  5. What a bittersweet story — the whole spectrum of aging challenges my self-absorbed little spirit to its limits, I have to admit. I love the adage: they know what it’s like to be our age, but we don’t know what it’s like to be their age. That’s one I need to keep in mind.

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  6. I laughed aloud when I read that a policeman might think you were having a seizure if you batted your eyelashes at him. Becoming invisible was easy for me. I was never heard, either, because my voice was too soft. That doesn’t matter any more. I am heard and seen on WordPress! Of course, that won’t last forever, but it’s wonderful right now.

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  7. I am with Anne, that line made me laugh out loud; I was just glad that my husband had stepped outside for a few minutes. Mine was more of a cackle than a laugh. Really loved this post. I tried commenting 3 x this morning but WP was being finicky. Ah well,

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  8. You’re a good dog mom and you were an awesome daughter, Laurie. I had some of those moments with my mom too, but in the end, she taught me many lessons, including patience.

    As you do, I keep moving regardless of age. Upright, breathing and moving is my goal from here forward. It’s how I can fight off the “old.”

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  9. What is that old adage, or bumper sticker, about not grumbling about getting old – it is a privilege denied to many. I grumble anyway. I hate the slowing-down feeling, like when suddenly my eyes are at half-mast and my head goes down … just like that. A little scary. I am looking forward to retirement very much Laurie and I hope nothing gets in the way of it. It was supposed to be in two years when my boss closes the office at age 75 and retires after 50 years in the legal business, just like his father did for 50+ years. We have been so very slow, just before and now during the pandemic; I hope we get back to regular business soon and he does not shut the office down – he is a person who loves working, believe me, he thrives on it. But I don’t plan to go out and have a regular job; working at home since 2011 has me less adaptable to a life that is that rigorous now … you had a very long day and I don’t know how you did it. I didn’t exercise in the a.m., but in Summer I worked out in the yard before catching the bus around 7:15 or so and didn’t get home til 6:00 at night with rush hour, etc. In the Winter, I shoveled the snow before leaving on that same time bus (always allowing for bad weather, a bus didn’t show up and in the Summer, the drawbridge would be up for the freighters sometimes a half hour or more). Always the same arrival time at night. In Winter leaving in the dark and coming home in the dark was disheartening … we eat, sleep and work was my mindset.

    My mom also used that expression “you will catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.” I however, made a rolling stop, on a rural road that leads to a mall I went to all the time, and was pulled over. My first (and only) stop for a moving violation ever. I smiled sweetly (probably batted my eyelashes as well) and I said “but Officer, there is NEVER anyone at this stop coming from the other side, but I really did stop.” However. he was not amused by such feminine tactics and said he saw me make a rolling stop, issued me a ticket and when he handed it to me, I started to cry. He probably thought that was more feminine wiles and just walked away. They were real tears, not put on – I’d never had a ticket and was horrified. The ticket was expensive, my insurance went up … it was probably a speedtrap as the next time I went to the mall, I saw someone else getting a ticket at the same location. Nowadays, the Facebook Neighborhood Crime/Info groups alerts people to speedtraps. 🙂

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    • Wow! I could not even imagine working until age 75. I would be run into the ground by then. I had a financial advisor like that – he never wanted to retire. He finally retired when he was in his mid-80s and passed away less than 6 months later.

      I can remember leaving and returning to my house in the dark too. I am so glad I don’t have to run in the dark anymore. Except for when we did 4x4x48, I haven’t used my headlamp for years.

      Good for the neighborhood watch and speed trap alerts. I will have to look into our local FB group.

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  10. I am with you on the battling age front. I have the feeling that once I accept age as an excuse for slowing down, I’m on a slippery downhill slope.
    Your pre-retirement life sounds exhausting – I’m happy that you get to enjoy life now!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Unfortunately, I battled a hamstring/piriformis a few years ago. My speed didn’t gradually decline – it fell off a cliff! I got some of it back but I still don’t think I’m to the place I would have been without the injury.

      I am so happy I get to enjoy life more now. I loved teaching and miss the kids but the schedule was crazy!

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  11. My mother had so many old sayings that she repeatedly told us kids. I still say some of them. I lost my mother when I was in my 30’s – over 30 years ago – still miss and talk to her. My last birthday I made the age where I outlived her as my older brother and sister had done before me. Amazing how creaky the body gets as we age. Have a blessed day!

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    • I am sorry you lost your mother so young! I miss my mom almost every day, even though she has been gone for over 12 years. Blessings to you too, Carol.

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  12. I love this post. I try really hard to remember that everyone is not me, not with my experiences, not with my age, etc. And in the end, I’m always glad if I feel I’ve done the good thing, even if at the time it made me feel frustrated or annoyed.

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  13. So much of this resonated with me. Old age always seems beyond where I am. I’ve joked sometimes that the “middle age spread” isn’t so much the thickening waistline as it is the years we claim it. I don’t know what you call the time between middle age and old, so I stick with middle-aged. 🙂

    What a poignant thought that older people know what we feel, but we don’t understand their situation yet because we haven’t been there.

    I do love the slowing down aspect. Somehow I seem to always be busy, but I can’t imagine doing the things I used to do. I get exhausted just thinking about it.

    This is the second time in recent weeks that I have come across the concept of being invisible as we age. I’ve never had trouble claiming my age until the most recent milestone. then I was afraid of being written off, of not being listened to any more. And I am ashamed to say I got that idea from how I used to think about people the age I am now! Not that I necessarily wrote people off, but that I thought “Wow, that’s old” when I know now that it isn’t.

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    • Ha! Yes, “old” is always just a little bit older than I am. I am clinging to middle-aged by the skin of my teeth, even though if I really were in the middle of my life, I could rival some of the patriarchs in the Old Testament for longevity. 🙂

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  14. Hello, I am thankful for each day I have, happily retired and almost 64. Growing old is not something I try to think about. I have bad genes in the family. My mother had diabetes and was blind and an amputee. My father had Dementia. So I feel blessed with every day I feel normal… I had a laugh at your charming the police officer. There is so much to be thankful for, each day we wake up! Enjoy your day, have a great weekend ahead!

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  15. Laurie, judging from your photo, you are not old and have a long time to go before you are! My mother lived to 89 –just 6 months short of 90. Thankfully she was able to remain in her house of 60 years but that was because of a lot of help from me as I lived down the block from her in NYC back then. I have to admit as I get very close to 70 I see quite a few changes in my body that spell “old age” but I am trying my best to stay healthy and happy. The pandemic has not helped make these “golden years” as my husband and I had to cancel two cruises we had planned and looked forward to with excitement, but we know we’ll hopefully travel again someday soon. Right now we are enjoying our home and local hiking trails. We are happy we moved to Colorado to be near our children and grandchildren. One may have to help us one day when we get old! It’s the circle of life.

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    • Your mom was so lucky to be able to stay at home. My mom needed round the clock care when she was in her late 80s. My husband and I had to cancel trips to Morocco and Portugal as well as several domestic trips here in the US as a result of the pandemic. COVID is stealing all of our best traveling years! We hope to be able to travel to CO to visit our oldest son and family at the end of July. I am hoping one of our sons will help us when we get old. We don’t have daughters and they seem more likely to help! 🙂

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  16. I am feeling all this the more I age myself.
    That idea that we havent been their age but they have been ours- that’s really deep – I’ve never thought of it like that

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  17. I’m looking for more advantages! 🙂 My husband recently took a little spill on his small motorcycle and now we’ve been to the orthopedic doctor and are dealing with him having shoulder pain for quite some time ahead. Of course things like this can happen at any age, but at our ages, it takes so much longer to heal. Nonetheless, I’m working on my attitude, so thanks for your help. 🙂

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    • Oh no! Poor Jeff! So sorry to hear he had a motorcycle accident. It does take longer to heal as you get older. I find that with little niggling aches I get from running.

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  18. Great post Laurie you had me giggling at the following;
    “I turned on the charm. I smiled at the police officer. I may have batted my eyelashes. It worked. I got off with a warning. If I tried to do that now, the police officer would probably think I was having a seizure.”
    I did the same in m my thirties & got a warning too! Lol! 😀
    Blessings,
    Jennifer

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  19. My boss always said he wanted to “die with his boots on” like his dad. In fact, like your financial advisor, Robb’s father was still working at age 82 then had kidney disease and since he was diabetic he had complications and died shortly thereafter. He still had his law practice as a probate attorney and it was up to my boss to wrap up the practice. His parents lived about 90 miles away for Robb’s house, so he spent several days a week in Saginaw, re-assigning open files to other local attorneys, packing up and returning other files and dealing with closing the practice. So, his father was a solo practitioner and according to my boss, spent ALL his time at the office. He ate lunch at the office, came home for dinner, ate and returned to the office five nights a week, all day Saturday. That was my boss’ schedule until we slowed down in 2008 for the recession. Business has never been full throttle again, though we were busier than now. Robb will not know what to do with himself if retired and he collects artwork and labor-related cartoons – about a hundred of them all over the office. He’s got some eclectic taste, but who can fit 50 years of accumulated items into your house?

    I would not want the dark departures/arrivals again.

    Do look into such a FB group Laurie. I glean lots of info from those groups … there are two for our City and one for the local area. It’s got crime info, general info, questions asked and answered. Of course sometimes people disparage one another, just like news sites … but you can’t beat it for local info.

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    • Yes, I lived a crazy schedule when I taught too. I am much happier with just my blogging schedule to worry about. We babysat for our grandkids this week and I only published twice, when I usually publish 3 peices a week. Oh, well!

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      • It is good to go a little slower now … you had distractions this week, but good distractions. I posted a lot this week but I wanted to keep with the theme of “youngsters” for Father’s Day. I have one more post for Father’s Day coming up, then I’ll slow down a little after that. I took a lot of photos last weekend and still have some photos to make three posts from last Summer!

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      • I think we are finally going to do our transition to Windows 10 and the new accounting system at work. I have a lot of stuff on my Windows 7 laptop – have to find a place to put it as I store my pictures in the laptop I’m on now, a 10-year old laptop … I’m not big on technology changes and our computer guy has dropped the ball bigtime having ordered the equipment in March 2019. The new laptop has been set up, but I don’t use it (it is on my stovetop as I have nowhere to plug it in – very few outlets in this house) … every time I want to cook something, I have to put it somewhere –
        annoying. I am a few posts ahead (all next week) and hope to stay doing that after the long holiday, to allow for frustrations at work. The good thing is the new laptop is much bigger than this one – it will be nice for that reason. Now I am headed out before it gets too hot … we are in for a scorcher today. I tried to post this message last night and it wouldn’t work, just the “like” … go figure. Happy Father’s Day to Bill – what did you end up getting him Laurie?

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      • Good for you for working ahead, Linda. With everything going on with Benji right now, I am so far behind on responding to comments, etc. I usually publish a post on Tuesday nights but right now, I have nothing. Oh, well…it’s not like it’s a job, right? I got Bill a shirt that he said he wanted for Father’s Day. Not too exciting!

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      • I am a little behind in Reader too and will likely not make it there tonight as we have a thunderstorm rolling in soon. Is Benji still having problems fainting? Yes, it’s not a job and less posts are good if you have other irons in the fire – that’s what I tell myself but I don’t always follow my advice to myself. I don’t count Wordless Wednesday as it is just a few photos and not narrative. I have three posts this week, but I did them last week when I had more time.

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      • We took Benji to the vet last Saturday and were told he had to go to the animal hospital over an hour away. We were at the hospital all day. Benji was admitted. Thousands of dollars later, on Monday, they told us there was nothing more they could do for him and wanted to euthanize him. I said we would bring him home. After 2 days of him not being able to walk or eat and us giving him 8 different medications, he showed up in the bathroom when I was in the shower! He was hungry. He is better, but not 100% recovered. We continue to give him his medications and just got them refilled. We are hoping for the best. The vet at the hospital told us there was <10% chance of him surviving. I have been giving him his medications every few hours and not really in the mood for blogging. I think I will get back to it next week.

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      • Oh Laurie – I am sorry to read this. I remembered you said Benji had fainted a few weeks ago but you had a hot spell. I am glad that you were able to get in to see a specialist, but sorry that their solution was to euthanize him. I’m glad you brought him home and hope this rally back and looking for you in the shower to feed him is a good sign. 🙂 It is difficult when pets are sick. After I lost my last canary to a stroke I will not get another pet, despite living alone and having no family members, so having a companion pet was nice but I’m not up to the heartache. I will keep Benji in my thoughts and prayers – I have a long prayer list for friends and friends of friends so will add Benji.

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      • Linda, I am sorry to have to report that the rally was short-lived and I think we need to take him to the vet for the last time on Monday. I just haven’t been myself during this ordeal. I don’t have the energy to blog. Thank you for your prayers.

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      • Oh Laurie – I am sorry and I had a suspicion that since you had no recent post(s) that might be the cause. I’ll be thinking of you, especially Monday and I’m sorry it turned out this way for Benji.

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      • It won’t just be tough on you and Bill. but also the young woman who always has taken care of Benji when you are away. You said she really liked caring for him. I remember Benji originally belonged to one of your sons … what a great addition he has made for you and Bill as empty nesters. Benji, you will be missed.

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  20. It’s so true Laurie. Despite the challenges that getting old brings us there are also a lot of wonderful advantages too and it is absolutely all about how your perceive yourself and your age. At 29, I already feel a huge difference in my ability to be myself without judgement from others now than when I was 20. Many people fear growing old but something I look forward to is the growing comfort I will have in who I am as each year passes. #wotw

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    • Wendy, you will be an awesome 60 or 70- or 80-year old runner. You are so high-spirited and alive! Getting older is definitely better than the alternative. 🙂

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  21. Great post.

    Love that quote.

    I am still working and I can’t imagine not.

    That being said I could not still be teaching. Hardest and most tiring job in the world. But the most rewarding.

    Now I just do my thing. No rewards but no stress.

    I plan to run or stay active as long as I can. Speed has gone out the window. But who cares.

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  22. Invisibility has its advantages.

    Yes, yes. I’ve found this to be true, too. I’m glad you’ve taken to your retirement with an ease and a wisdom that suggests you’re doing the right thing for you now. Not everyone is so astute or adaptable.

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  23. It’s a good reminder that – that our elderly loved ones have been our age but we have not been theirs and therefore we can’t quite put ourselves in their shoes. Not that it’s easy to be patient and try to understand. Benji looks like a lovely dog. He reminds me of the dog I had when I was a child. Slowing down is a good thing – I know that I’ve welcomed the enforced slow-down that lockdown has brought in many ways. And I find becoming more invisible as I get older is a good thing too – it is very liberating in many ways. Your mum and my mum would agree on other people being old rather than them. Age is certainly a state of mind for many people. #WotW

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  24. What a good read. Seeing our loved one’s get old is hard. My dad is in his mid 70’s and sometimes I wish he would slow down and retire but at the same time I think he would find it so boring. It is just a state of mind. x

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  25. Oh God, that last one. My parents went kicking & screaming (almost literally, although it was us screaming at them they couldn’t stay in the house).

    My Dad had dementia, but it wasn’t the sweet kind. It was hell on earth for my mom. Although he was the love of her life, she is doing SO much better with him gone.

    I have been the caretaker for many elderly animals, so many nights of interrupted sleep, not knowing how exhausted I truly was until it was over. Luckily Lola, who is 14, sleeps through the night (so far, knock on wood, no doubt her day will come). But there are many other changes, like having to walk her early because she really can’t tolerate the heat — another thing I’ve been there, done that before.

    Although I admit it’s hard, the truth is we have to appreciate every age, warts and all. It’s all we’ve got!

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    • I have seen the same thing with clients from Melas on Wheels, Judy. Spouses who spent their whole lives being loving and kind suddenly become belligerent and angry.

      Benji’s walks have devolved into brief strolls where we just go across the road and back to our own yard. He is declining very rapidly. It’s heartbreaking.

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      • I’m so sorry, Laurie. I’ve been there & I’m sure you have to, but it never gets any easier. Lola’s getting SO heat intolerant, but still doing ok. At 14, though, realistically I know it’s not that far away.

        Big, big hugs. It’s so hard to watch. Chester’s been gone 4.5 years, and it still makes me sad sometimes.

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      • We took Benji to the vet today. Wound up taking him to an animal hospital a 1-hour drive from our house. He needed a blood transfusion as soon as possible! As it turns out, he will need to stay until at least Monday. It will cost us thousands of dollars. I just hope he comes home to us. I know you understand.

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  26. What an insightful and thoughtful post on aging. I feel I have aged prematurely because of my disabilities, before I got sick I was rushing around constantly, but now I’ve had to slow down so much. Slowing down can be good, but I thought I had a few more years of rushing around left in me. If it wasn’t for my youngsters I’d probably be feeling a lot older.

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  27. I love that quote about how your mom understood your age (because she’d lived it), but you hadn’t yet lived her’s. I need to write that down and read it daily LOL I’m really having a struggle with my mom. Mind you, she’s never been the touchy-feeling, kind-hearted role model I’d wished her to be, but now she’s really a grumpy old gal most days. I don’t know how my father puts up with her. I definitely think her mind is going and there’s some depression/anxiety at play, but she’s so defensive that it’s a losing battle to get her any help (or “happy” meds). I’m just taking the high road and being nice about it because I know the day will come when I may regret not being more compassionate. UGH, aging sucks!

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    • I am so sorry to hear that about your mom, Kim. You seem to be so happy and outgoing. You must take after your father. Of course, you would take the high road. Aging DOES suck.

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  28. Oh Laurie … reading this made me alternate between tears and laughter. So much poignant wisdom. The part about how older people know what it’s like to our age but we don’t know what it’s like to be theirs … I never thought of that before but it’s so true. The older I get, the more I’m with you and your mom—age is a state of mind!

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  29. I love old dogs. I know they have their quirks, but they seem to understand more. I can see my father turning into my grandfather. Makes me wonder if I’ll be the same. I’ve already warned my children. Totally agree that patience does improve with age. I remember a friend’s mother talking about how you come more invisible as you get older. She must have been in her 60s/70s at the time. It puzzled me as I could not imagine people ignoring her, but I quite liked the idea. Doing whatever I liked. #wotw

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  30. Very good post. I’m in my 50’s and it crossed my mind just the other day when my mom was my age. Back then, this age seemed so old. My spirit still feels like I’m in my twenties. However, my body reminds me regularly that that’s far from the truth.

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  31. Laurie, hi! your thoughts on caring for your mother in her later years are true gift to me this morning as we walk through this hospice season with my own.

    i pray for tenderness, patience, grace, joy. thank you for sharing a bit of where you’ve been. it’s been helpful …

    bless you, friend.

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    • Oh, I am so sorry about your mother, Linda. Sending prayers for you and her. It’s not easy. I am so glad if my words could help a little bit. Blessings to you dear friend!

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  32. Your daily schedule of teaching is mine down to the letter, including eating breakfast in my classroom. It really is exhausting. I have been enjoying this time at home more than I can say. For a change I am well rested and I am appreciating it. I received an email about going back to school with teacher training (covid rules) the last week of July. Can’t say I am looking forward to it 😦 Bless your dog. My Jack Russell is 15 years old and goes out many times a night. Easier to take when I don’t have to get up for work. Thanks for linking up and some life reflection.

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    • Michelle, I think most people don’t realize how hard teachers work! Kudos to you for sticking it out in the classroom. 31 years were enough for me. I miss the kids but not the schedule! Thanks for hosting.

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  33. Such an insightful post. I especially love when you stated older people know what it’s like to be our age, but we don’t know what it is like to be their age – such wisdom. I just retired from teaching this month so it still feels like I am just on summer break. Maybe it will hit me once school starts back and I don’t. In the meantime I am trying to establish new routines and concentrating more on what I can do to keep active and stay healthy. Trying to maintain a positive attitude and looking forward to when more opportunities to get involved in the community open back up so I can start pursuing interests and friendships.

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  34. Such a beautiful and touching post, Laurie!! ❤ You touched on many things I think about all the time about aging, and our ability to understand things now that could not be understood in the same way when we were younger. This post really melted my heart! ❤ Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

  35. Laurie, Benji’s huge smile makes me smile. A very poignant, wise and well written post. Also, relatable. Your patience and love for your Mother shines through in this story. I am sure she felt it. Compassion, empathy, kindness are good reminders. I sometimes do notice being “invisible.” I don’t always paint this in a positive light. I will reconsider after reading your thoughts. Tears brimming. A beautiful post, Laurie.❤️

    Liked by 1 person

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