Taking The Plank Out Of My Eye

I don’t know a perfect person. I only know flawed people who are still worth loving.– John Green

Meditations in Motion

My hubby Bill and I were driving on Main Street in Lititz this week. Our picturesque town has become a tourist destination, with shops and restaurants lining the local thoroughfares.

Tourists, often unsure of their immediate destination, sometimes wander into the lightly-traveled street to the consternation of local drivers. One such group of sightseers was beginning to cross the road in the middle of the block as we approached.

Bill, nice guy that he is, stopped the car to allow them to cross. The only problem was that as he stopped, the back of our car was still in the crosswalk, blocking it so that another group of tourists, attempting to cross legally, had to wait.

What are you doing?” I asked in a tone that was more accusatory than I meant it to be, making eye contact with the group of tourists on standby at the crosswalk. Bill and I exchanged a few words which I will not recount here, then continued our journey home.

I sat in silence, thinking self-righteous thoughts about drivers not paying attention to people in crosswalks (as a runner, I experience this often) and tourists clogging up the roads with their oblivious indecision.

Then I had to laugh at myself when I remembered to think, “It’s a good thing at least I am a perfect person.

Meditations in Motion

Why is it so easy to see (and comment on) faults in others, while being tolerant of our own weaknesses?

I think we may focus on others’ shortcomings because that allows us to overlook our own.

There have been many times when I didn’t see someone entering a crosswalk until it was too late to stop. I have also dithered around while figuring out where to turn in an unfamiliar location and I have jaywalked numerous times.

My new rule for myself is to identify a time when I did something similar before I express irritation with others. Even though I am a flawed person, I hope to still be worth loving.

I think Jesus was onto something when he said, “ How can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ when all the time there is a plank in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the plank out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother’s eye.

 

I am linking with Welcome Heart for Let’s Have Coffee, Debbie at Dare 2 Hear Amy at Live Life Well, Raisie Bay for Word of the Week, Susan B Mead for Dancing With Jesus, Embracing the Unexpected for Grace and Truth, Random-osity for Little Things Thursdays, Reflections From Me for A Blogging Good Time, Knit by God’s Hand for Thankful Thursdays, and Morgan’s Milieu for Post, Comment, Love.

Please click on the following link to read more funny or inspirational one-liners. One-Liner Wednesday.

Meditations in Motion

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78 comments

  1. ‘How can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ when all the time there is a plank in your own eye?’ — I’ve always taken this passage as proof that Jesus had a sense of humor, and wasn’t afraid of to use of sarcasm 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I agree, it is easy to focus on things others do that annoy us and to overlook the fact that often we are guilty of similar things. Rembering our own shortcomings can definitely help us have more grace for others.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Nice post Laurie, Froyed said ” you can’t help someone tell you’ve walked a mile in there shouse and experienced what they go throw ” we all have brain farts at times and do things we shouldn’t that’s gust human nature.

    ❤️✌️
    BY FOR NOW

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  4. Isn’t this so hard? I have been there so many times, pointing out the flaws of someone I love instead of looking at my own. Praying for the love and grace to see my flaws and bring them to the cross instead of looking at those in other people.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Praying for the same thing, Rebecca. It reminds me of a quote from Ann Lamotte: “I want this softening, this surrender, this happiness. The problem is, I love to be, and so often am, right.”

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  5. Did Jesus really say “You hypocrite?” Seems kind of harsh for the prince of peace. Over the past five years or so, I’ve gotten really good at not commenting on the idioticy of others. My wife instituted a wise speech edict for herself, and I’ve done my best to follow it. But sometimes, you really have to let it out, because all of us, at times, are ridiculously self-centered idiots.

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    • Yep. He said it. I think Jesus is unnecessarily sanitized by some Christians. He was pretty feisty when he needed to be! I am just trying to be a “ridiculously self-centered idiot” less of the time! 🙂

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  6. I could have written this piece myself; that goes to show that what you expressed is the dilemma and universal aspect of the human condition! All we can do is be aware and work on ourselves to the best of our ability. For me, that is all God asks of me, to not be perfect but to at least try and become more aware. Thank you for your honesty and your humanity…and your awareness! A great share.

    Susan Grace

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  7. Your new rule for yourself is a good one, Laurie. This post reminds me of what I like to call “parking-lot grace.” It involves extending grace to people who make mistakes in parking lots (such as nearly running me and my shopping cart over while backing up) because I have often needed such grace extended to me. And it applies to the open road as much as it does to parking lots (not to mention all sorts of other scenarios)! 🙂

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  8. I am very bad about sticking the nose of my car out into crosswalks. And here in our neighborhood, early in the a.m. a time or two, I’ve been guilty of not noticing a runner waiting to cross in front of me at a stop sign. Need to do better. I love this idea of recognizing my own imperfections before listing someone else’s!! Imagine! I do try to think how my husband, daughter, boss might be feeling but often jump all over them anyway. No bueno. Thank you for this thoughtful post. And for linking up for Wellness Wednesday.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I had to laugh as I just finished having a go at my husband about something I’m a tad guilty of as well. It was so incredibly minor as to not even be worth the words, but there you have it. It reminds me of a line in a song by the Aussie band, The Whitlams: “thank you for loving me at my worst.”

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  10. Hello, I know I am not perfect and I try not to judge others. I think we all should have more patience for others, seeing bad drivers is especially nerve wrecking. Wishing you a happy day!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. A great post. It makes me think about all the situtations in my city (Civitavecchia) where every year 2.500.000 tourists come by the cruise ships and walk in the middle of the traffic. Moreover, as a runner, I am scared of running at 08.00 a.m. when people go to work and the boys go to school: they are always in hurry.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Wow! That is a lot of tourists! We don’t get nearly that many, but the town I live in has only 6,000 citizens. I try to time my runs for low traffic times too. I especially hate to run when students are going to school. Those inexperienced drivers can be scary!

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  12. We are SOOOOO good at picking out others flaws & never seeing our own. I think that’s a big issue in why our country is at odds with one another lately. Grace for others seems long gone in a lot of areas.

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    • Oh, that is a great point. Social media is full of people who love to find fault with others, especially those with different political views than theirs. I have started following only runners. They are a pretty positive bunch.

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  13. This is perfect timing for me! I was criticized for something this week and then I started to think of all the things that person has done that I don’t like. I wanted to make it about them. But I think in this case, I’ll have to let all parties involved ‘off the hook’. And take the criticism as best I can! Thanks for the scripture and insight!

    Liked by 1 person

    • It is tough to swallow criticism you feel is undeserved. When people criticize us out of their anger, jealousy, frustration, or even hatred, Jesus commands that we not only forgive them but that we pray for them and seek to bless them. It’s not easy, as I have found out! 🙂

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  14. There are so many times that I complain about something someone else does and then on reflection realize it is something that I have done myself. I try hard now to stop and thing before I criticize.

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  15. This is a spot on post. I am always trying to check myself and not judge others. I really dislike being judged, and who doesn’t! Thanks for your continued words of wisdom. I always appreciate them. Thanks for linking up.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Spur of the moment utterances happen all the time – it is hard to to remember to not be critical – I am critical all the time, but don’t mouth it out loud, or even quietly – not in today’s world. Anymore it is “count to ten” first. 🙂

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  17. You’re are so right, and often what we point out to others is exactly what we do.

    OTOH, we are also our own worst critics. Most of us in my YTT group were SO anxious to hear back, thinking we hadn’t done well, myself included. Yet I got some lovely feedback!

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  18. I can very much relate to this. I know I see things in others that I exhibit myself (or I hate things in others I dislike in myself) but although I can lose my temper or get grumpy at certain things in the moment, I’m prone to mull over things and (later – sadly) be able to realise the other side of the story or how things could have been different!

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