Laughing in Flowers: An Oregon Garden

The earth laughs in flowers.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

Meditations in Motion

I was walking in my son and daughter-in-law’s garden in Oregon one morning this week. The Morning Glories were glorious.

Meditations in Motion

The Black-Eyed Susans were winking at me.

Meditations in Motion

The roses were blushing.

And I was the one who was laughing.

Meditations in Motion

Do you know the name of the plant this bumble bee is visiting?

Meditations in Motion

If we take a step back, do you know what it is now?

Meditations in Motion

How about now?

I will give you a clue: dipping its leaves in melted butter then scraping it through your front teeth is a delicious, but slow way to have a snack.

“I love to think of nature as an unlimited broadcasting station, through which God speaks to us every hour, if we will only tune in.”George Washington Carver

 

I am linking with Cee’s Flower of the Day, Welcome Heart for Let’s Have Coffee, Debbie at Dare 2 Hear Amy at Live Life Well, Raisie Bay for Word of the Week, Susan B Mead for Dancing With Jesus, Embracing the Unexpected for Grace and Truth, Random-osity for Little Things Thursdays, Reflections From Me for A Blogging Good Time, Knit by God’s Hand for Thankful Thursdays, Morgan’s Milieu for Post, Comment, Love, Esme Salon for Senior Salon, My Random Musings for Anything Goes, and Shank You Very Much for Global Blogging.

Please click on the following link to read more funny or inspirational one-liners. One-Liner Wednesday.

Meditations in Motion

 

 

 

 

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65 comments

  1. Oh, my, Laurie, I’m so ashamed! My dad was a life-long biologist, and I should know the name of this plant. When I think butter, I think popcorn – no, that can’t be right . . .
    Anyway, your photos are lovely. Thank you for sharing God’s creation with us!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Beautiful photos! I love the variety of flowers God has created. I have no idea about the mystery flower. Identifying flowers is not my strong point anyway but I’m wondering if it’s one we don’t have here, and I have never heard of dipping leaves in melted butter. Intrigued to find out…

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, we were there several years ago. My son went to Oregon State for grad school, so we always flew into Portland and spent a day or two there before traveling down to Corvallis. I love that city!

      Like

  3. That Morning Glory pic almost jumps out of my screen! It is incredible. 🙂

    I was thinking Passionfruit flower in the first pic (check them out!) but when i saw the whole bud i recognised the Artichoke. 🙂

    GWC got it spot on in my opinion.

    They can sometimes be hard work, but a good garden is a gift of Grace that lifts the soul. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much. Coming from an experienced flower photographer like you, I take that as high praise! It DOES look like a passionfruit flower. I wonder if they are related.

      My mom used to have a cross-stitch sampler in her kitchen “Who plants a seed beneath the sod, and waits to see, believes in God.” She was a gardener! 🙂

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      • I just checked.. no relation. 😦

        Interestingly the passionfruit is more closely related to a Rose! I suppose the seed in the passionfruit held the clue? 😉

        It’s hard not to believe in God if you spend much time tending to a garden. I question his insistence in the proliferation of slugs and snails however – does that mean i’m going to hell?? 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Huh! I would have thought they would be related too. Now that you mention it, I can see how the seed in the passionfruit is similar to rose hips.

        I question His apparent fondness for various hideous forms of insects (but I kind of like slugs and snails). I think that just makes us human. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Aha! On a recent walk my husband and a couple of friends and I came upon a blooming artichoke, looking just like the one in your photo, growing in a neglected patch of dirt. It was probably a fugitive from a nearby restaurant garden. Nobody believed me when I identified it as an artichoke gone to flower. “No,” they said, “that’s some kind of thistle.”
    “Artichokes ARE thistles,” I said in my fetchingly know-it-all way. My husband and friends remained unconvinced.
    Thank you for helping me be right 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I thought it was a thistle at first too, Jan. My son told me what it was. He did not plant it – it must have been the previous owner of their house. I need to adopt a more fetching manner when I am a know-it-all. Good strategy! 🙂

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  5. Hi Laurie, what pretty flowers. When we moved into this house morning glories trailed all along the front wall and my husband and Dad pulled them up saying they were weeds (I did protest – big time – what’s the definition of a weed?) and they never grew back. Our neighbours have artichoke plants dotted around their garden, but they always pick them before they flower. They do look like a type of thistle too.

    xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • A…that’s a shame about the morning glories! They were so pretty at my son’s house. I guessed thistle at first, but my son told me what it was. I wonder if the two plants are related.

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    • Well, the artichoke was actually in a neglected corner of my son’s garden. I thought it was a huge thistle at first. I have always loved Black Eyed Susans too- my older sister (whom I adore) is named Susan. I have some good sunflower photos too. I am saving them for another post! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I had to look through the comments to discover it was an artichoke plant – I’ve never eaten artichokes before! The flowers are beautiful – you picked up where you left off in the Spring Laurie with displaying those delicate blooms.

    Liked by 1 person

    • My mom used to serve artichokes with melted butter as a special treat. You peel off the leaves, dip them in the butter, then draw them through your teeth without actually taking a bite of the leaf. I often use canned artichoke hearts in recipes too. I love taking flower photos, Linda. They don’t move like your critters do!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, the bees loved these artichoke flowers too. They were usually covered with honeybees and bumblebees. I can imagine that 15 artichoke plants might be too much of a good thing!

      Like

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