The Place Where the Light Enters

The wound is the place where the Light enters you.Rumi

Meditations in Motion

I have to admit that I never have been a “Christmas person“. Oh, maybe when I was a girl I loved Christmas, but as a young mom, there was always so much stress.

There were family obligations to juggle, the house to decorate, meals to plan and execute and, of course, gifts to buy. My husband and I married and had children while we were still quite young. We lived on a very tight budget. It was not easy to find the money to buy presents for three little boys, our parents and each other, even though I put aside a little bit every week into a Christmas fund. Somehow we managed, but every year, it was difficult to pull all the pieces together.

As my kids got older and left the house and money became a little more plentiful, December was still a busy time for me, due to the demands of managing several dozen students’ science fair projects at school. I regularly worked 60 – 70 hours a week, which left precious few hours for gift shopping, holiday parties, baking Christmas cookies, and other responsibilities. I always felt as though I slid into Christmas morning, harried and exhausted from completing everything on my list.

I think the event that finally completed my descent into Scrooge-dom was the death of my mom a few days before Christmas several years ago. My mom and I were always close, geographically and emotionally.

I used to call my mom every day, just to talk, when my kids were growing up. She was a generous, loving person, who gave compassionate advice, without ever seeming to give advice at all. My kids loved to spend time with my mom and dad, who, in return, spoiled them rotten, which, of course, is the duty of all grandparents. After my father died, my sons helped Mom maintain her house and yard. She paid them “Grandma wages“, about 10 times the minimum wage.

Meditations in Motion

Mom and I loved to go out for lunch, and maybe sneak a glass of wine or a Bloody Mary in the middle of the day, then talk for hours. She was a steadying, encouraging, and calming presence in my life.

Mom had a stroke three years before she died, which rendered her incapable of caring for herself. She couldn’t read or even watch TV, due to her impaired short-term memory. She suffered from dementia and eventually was wheelchair-bound.

I was working full time, so the only option I could see for my mom was to place her in assisted living in a nearby retirement community. I was away from home for many hours during the day and she could not be left alone.

I considered hiring a companion for her while I worked, but was concerned about drawing down her retirement fund. What would happen if I drew down her nest egg, and then she had to go into a retirement home anyway? Without resources, her options would be severely limited.

Meditations in Motion

I visited Mom every day, usually helping with her shower in the evening and getting her into bed. In the summertime, when school was out, we would still go out for lunch and a Bloody Mary. Even so, I was consumed with guilt for not keeping her at home. She had been an excellent mother to me. I worried that I was not a good enough daughter to her.

After watching Mom slowly decline for three agonizing years, Mom passed away four days before Christmas in a year that I missed school for the entire month of December, due to an illness of my own. This was, without a doubt, the lowest point of my life.

I went through Mom’s funeral in a haze, then returned to school in January. I still faced long work weeks and grinding deadlines, but something inside of me had shifted.

Meditations in Motion

I was more patient with students at school. I would sit and talk for hours after class if a student needed to talk. My relationship with my husband improved dramatically. We began to enjoy spending time with each other again, after years of drifting apart. Faith became an important part of my life, rather than an obligation.

I ran the Miami marathon six weeks after Mom died. My companion for the trip was my youngest son. It was the first time we had traveled together, just the two of us. I was amazed at what a wonderful traveling buddy he was. We went out for dinner, lounged on the beach and strolled around the city. He took care of everything – driving our rental car,Β  remembering to bring along a hotel key when we ventured out, and finding our way around a strange city in the days before everyone’s phone contained GPS.

Being wounded teaches us compassion and love. Sometimes, that’s what it takes. I needed that deflated “self” to let the Light in. Because I was all puffed up with self-importance, there was no room for God’s light to shine through me. All of those chores that were so crucial were actually my over-inflated ego reminding me how indispensable I was.

All of the business, all of that stress, even the guilt were forms of selfishness. I was considering myself before God and others. Guilt and shame are the worst sentiments in your emotional toolbox. Berating yourself for not doing better, not being better, is denying God’s mercy and abundant grace. Why should you judge yourself harshly when God is the God of redemption, forgiveness, and joy?

Meditations in Motion

In this season of light, exultation, rejoicing, and exuberance let’s allow some room in our hearts for God’s grace. Permit that grace and love to crowd out any guilt, shame or selfishness. Let others see the Light shining through you. I consider that to be my mom’s last precious gift to me.

Let all bitterness and wrath and anger and clamor and slander be put away from you, along with all malice. Be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ forgave you.” -Ephesians 4:31-32
I am linking up with Purposeful Faith for RaRa link up, Abounding Grace for Gracefull Tuesday, Char at Trekking Thru, Shank You Very Much for Dream Team, Shelbee on the Edge for Spread the Kindness, Meghan Weyerbacher for Tea and Word, Mary Geisen Tell His Story, Nicole and Annmarie for Wild Workout Wednesday, Holley Gerth for Coffee for Your Heart, Worth Beyond Rubies, Amelia Gilliand for Words That Inspire, Kristin Hill Taylor for Porch Stories, Debbie at Dare 2 Hear, Reflections From Me for A Blogging Good Time, Random-osity for Little Things Thursdays, It’s a Small Town Life for Thankful Thursday, Crystal Storms for Heart Encouragement, Be Thee Inspired, Lori Schumaker for Moments of Hope, and Bethere2day for Wordless Wednesday on a Tuesday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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76 comments

  1. Laurie, this is a beautiful tribute to your mom. You may not have kept mom at home, but friend, you gave her the best thing – you, your company, your love. And perhaps a few extra glasses of wine or bloody mary’s. May your memories of days together bring deep and lasting comfort. Blessings! And a {{hug}}.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, Joanne. I guess we all do the best we can, but I can’t help looking back and thinking I could have done more. Hugs are gratefully accepted! πŸ™‚

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  2. This story gave me goose bumps, and I know well the feeling of inadequacy, the “I’m abandoning my mum” guilt, and even though mum has been in heaven for over a year, I still will occasionally dream that I don’t know where she is.
    Thanks for sharing your own experience at this tenuous time of year.

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  3. Thank you for so candidly (and kindly) sharing these perfectly timed, encouraging words–for this relentlessly busy season for Moms.

    Perhaps we will pause– and let the Light shine through each of our wounds, so we can soak in the peace of that Miracle:
    “… by His wounds we are healed.” (Isaiah 53:5)

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  4. Wow, Laurie. You made me tear up with the beauty in this post. I’m so sorry you lost your mom. I am blessed to also have a close relationship with my mom, with both of my parents, actually. I love your reminder to give ourselves grace, but also to give it abundantly to others. You’ve given me some good things to consider as we enter this holiday season. Thank you, Laurie.

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  5. I was just speaking with another friend today about a very similar thing – how our lives change after our parents pass away, because we become more self-reflective. I have lost several family members on Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, and in the month of December, so I can understand how much greater the loss can feel during the holidays, but I can not imagine having lost a mother at that time! My heart goes out to you. Though many of us wonder if we did enough for our parents as they aged, I am willing to bet that we did exactly what we needed to. You and your mother were a gift to one another! Thank you for sharing such a moving post.

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    • Yes, Anita. I was actually thinking of you when I wrote this post. I remember the lovely post you wrote about your mother on Mothers’ Day. No matter what we do for our family members, we always feel like we could have done more. My mom was certainly a gift to me. Thank you for your very kind comment.

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  6. Wonderful post. Encouraging through hard memories and the brightness of the light that is always there if we will just let it in. I have always been encouraged by the light of Christmas. May you and yours be blessed this season.

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  7. This is such an important, valuable post. I take away much strength and hope from your experiences. Christmas duties were always on my shoulder in my family (hubby was not a Christmas person) and working full time like you , it put so much stress on me. But somehow I managed, and I always saw happy faces on Christmas morning. Yet I believe simple is best and each year I get older, I make it even more simple. My Mom at 87 is healthy and we have a good relationship which is a huge blessing since it wasn’t always so.

    I simply want to make each day count, not take my loved ones for granted, give copious smiles and hugs, and the rest takes care of itself.

    Thank you for your light and wisdom!

    Liked by 1 person

    • The philosophy you have shared is wonderful! Nothing better than letting loved ones know they are appreciated. Spend time with your mom while you can! πŸ™‚ Thank you for the kind comment.

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  8. This was very close to my heart because I was very close to my mom as well. She passed away in January of 2010, but she had an episode of dizziness in April of 2009 – we went to the E.R. thinking it was a stroke, but they said it was merely dehydration. I did not believe that diagnosis then, and don’t believe it now. I lived with my mom – knew her like a book and something happened to my mom while I was running an errand on Easter weekend and came home to find her slumped in a chair. It is so difficult to watch a loved one with dementia as well. I will mention this here as I did not want to mention it in the post I did about the flickering lights – I met a neighbor around the corner, same age as us, and he is a full-time caregiver. His wife came out of the house – he wanted her to meet me. Four years into her diagnosis of dementia – she alternately stared at the floor, then cried. He waved at her to cheer her up, like a person would wave at a little baby. I have been struggling with something wrong with my shoulder for three weeks now – it is painful, I cannot reach behind me and have no range of motion – I’ve dwelled on this sudden onset of pain and I left the conversation with this neighbor thinking I won’t dwell on this anymore because it is merely an arm, a pain, a distraction in my life – this woman has lost her mind and her husband has lost a life partner. It upset me as I walked down to the Park and her face and actions have haunted me since that day. I commend you for all you did for your mom – you did not abandon her by not getting a caretaker – she was in capable hands at the home you put her in. How sad it is to get old – something I never really dwelled on much until lately.

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    • I am so sorry to read about your mom. I am sure you knew her better than anyone else. When my mom had her stroke, she called me to come over to her house and make her some soup. She said she just felt “funny”. She refused to go to the doctor. she wanted to be left alone. I think she knew something was terribly wrong. I left, but then thought better of it and went back to her house and insisted she go to the ER with me. My brother-in-law, who is a doctor, finally convinced her to let me take her. She had a rather large stroke. Losing a person to dementia is heartbreaking. I think you and I are the same age. We get aches and pains and wonder…Hoping the pain in your shoulder goes away! Maybe you should see a doctor?

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      • I still believe my mom had a stroke, maybe just a TIA, but something happened to her that day and I was only gone a few minutes running some errands. She wanted to go to bed and did so and slept the rest of the day and all of Easter Sunday. I begged her to let me take her to the E.R. – she insisted nothing was wrong but she was very dizzy and I would not have been able to help her down the stairs. She was a little better on Easter Monday. That was the diagnosis. My mother had issues with cellulitis in her legs, sciatica in her both hips and the dizziness all that year. The dizziness caused me to work from home to help out there (though I was on shorter hours due to the recession) and with no family, I stayed with my mom. She could not stand due to the cellulitis in her legs (she would get flareups which caused her legs to get swollen), she could not sit due to the sciatica and so she decided she would be better taking herself off to bed. That was not my mom – all her medical problems still did not cause her to stay in bed … it was not her nature. That was in October of 2009 and she never got up again. She got a perforated bowel and sepsis and then had to go to the hospital by ambulance and passed away 12 hours after arriving there. We are the same age. I don’t know what to make of the arm. It is not my dominant hand – it is my left hand. On top of my mother’s medical issues, from using a cane, and from using crutches years before, she developed a rotator cuff injury. She could not reach around or up. She was not a candidate for surgery, but we did have many PT sessions and a TENS unit after that – it helped a little. The symptoms are similar to my mom’s. I have tried babying it and since I didn’t lift anything, I believe it is the way I am sitting at the table on my laptop. I have re-arranged a few things and holding my left arm in the air – it may feel better or maybe I have willed it to feel better. I am deciding now if I should get someone to take care of the snow this Winter. I’d rather do that than risk straining my arm. I have to decide soon as we have had minor snow thus far and I’ve not had to shovel but may have snow coming the beginning of next week. I am icing/heating my arm and sleeping with a heating pad and hoping it will go away.

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      • I think my mom nad some TIAs before her stroke. We just didn’t recognize it at the time. she had a little fender bender and could not balance her checkbook for the first time in 60 years. My mom had sepsis too. That’s ultimately what caused her death. I was sick and could not keep a close eye on her the month that she died. I think if I could have been there, I could have interceded on her behalf. She was ready to go, though.

        It sounds like you have a repetitive use injury. Changing your sitting position could help. Maybe some PT could help too!

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      • It sounds like those TIAs were the precursor. Interestingly, my mom did “the books” in house. She paid all the bills (not electronically at that time) and she could not do that after this issue and her writing was very shaky. That was very telling to me as well. I kept that to myself but a couple of time she got angry with herself when she could not comprehend something she did for years. Sepsis is quick … they could have saved my mom with a massive dose of antibiotics but she would have required surgery and would not have lasted more than a few days – surgeon did not advise it and I didn’t argue as he said it would be painful as well. My mom was ready to go as well. I have a backup computer and am going to put it on a high countertop to use at night – I can’t edit as well I don’t think standing up, but I am on here hours at night for blogging and/or writing, catching up on social media with friends and I think I could stand and be in a better position for my arm. I did not do anything to injure my arm so that’s why I think it is related to how I am sitting. I still have the machine my mom used for heat and I’m going to get it from out of the cupboard – under many things and didn’t want to injure my arm digging for it. We rented a TENS unit but she has a moist heat pad that she used over her shoulder/upper arm. We did PT for maybe 5-6 weeks and it done no good … I was there to take her as she did not drive.

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      • Yes, I think the TIAs were the precursor to her stroke.

        My hubby wanted to get one of those stand-up desks for work (he works in an office), but he is retiring soon, so he never bothered. I hope the new position and the heat help your arm!

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      • I do know two people with those stand-up desks and they say it is good for their back – both of them are short though. I am 5′ 9″ tall. I have taken to using my right arm/hand for everything for reaching, except when I type I have no choice. But I tried putting my coat on my left arm first – that doesn’t work and it was cold and I wore a heavier coat, so had a difficult time. I must try something else – I’ll reconfigure my set-up in the morning. I will beat this and don’t want to take any OTC meds if possible.

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  9. It is just me now – I have no relatives. Christmas is no really meaningful to me anymore for that reason. My father, on Christmas Day of 1983, while unwrapping presents my mom and I had bought for him, announced he was sick of being in this family and would be leaving after the first of the year. My mom said “Linda, pick up all the presents we bought for your father and we’ll take them back to the store tomorrow and get our money back.” My father left the next day, but not before he took all the money out of the bank and forged my mom’s name to a joint annuity fund. Who does this on Christmas Day? Like you, I was always very close to my mom, but even more so after that day. My mom was only 58 years old, too young to collect social security and could not work as she had medical problems for years as a result of being hit by a car when she was 11 years old. It is rare when I mention my father in my blog posts – the other day I gave him credit for resolving my “leaves crisis” but you’ll never hear me give him credit for anything else. He is still alive – a German genealogist tracked him down for me at the request of my friend … my friend is very active in tracking down all her relatives for many generations back and he did a simple trace for her in Germany and asked if she would like anything else (evidently she overpaid him) so she gave him my father’s info (birthdate and place of birth in Germany) on my behalf. My friend had tried tracking him down before – I only wanted to know if he was dead or alive but Carol was not able to obtain this info – he did determine he was still alive – is 91 and will be 92 on December 3rd and remarried and living in a small German town. Feel free to delete this comment if you’d like as you moderate comments and no one will see it besides you Laurie.

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    • Linda, I am so sorry! It’s amazing that you have the positive outlook on life that you do, considering your father’s behavior. It is his loss, leaving behind a loving, compassionate, thoughtful and outgoing daughter. It sounds like you do not harbor hate in your heart for your father, which is good. Hate only hurts the person who feels it, not the person it is directed toward. I can certainly understand your wish to distance yourself from a toxic personality like your father seems to be. Some people are just broken. Who knows why? Thank you for your trust and confidence. You are a very special person.

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      • Thank you for saying that Laurie – I do not want to see him ever again. He was German born and went back to Germany but thankfully the house was paid for long ago, so my mother did not have that expense, and I was still living at home. I used to travel all the time and got along fine with my parents so I stayed here after I was finished with college so I could travel around and see the world before I settled down (I settled down, but not in the traditional way). I don’t like what he did to my mother – it was wrong and selfish and the bank and annuity fund should have questioned the withdrawals as they needed two signatures – he told both places my mother was out of the country on an emergency for her sick mother. My mother was no longer covered by his medical insurance either as he quit his job and sold his car and left the country. I helped out until my mom collected social security. So, I’ve not seen him since that day. Christmas was a little tainted after that – even though you have no regard or love for that person, his statement should never have been done on Christmas Day. Though I was close to my mom before, I was even more so after this. My mother’s death was shocking to me – I thought she would linger, confined to bed, though her spirit was broken and she had these horrible dizzy episodes while in bed where she could not put her glasses on as she had double vision. My mom and I both had our medical paperwork done years before for DNR orders and I knew her wishes as she did mine – I could not force the issue with her … I suggested we go to the E.R. a week before she died when she had pain in her side … she forbid me to call the ambulance. I called anyway and we had a bad fight … she said I went against her wishes and I cancelled the ambulance. She was calm then … but I had to call the day I called the ambulance to take her to the hospital as she woke up and was not lucid. She didn’t know who I was and I had just been speaking to her the night before. My mom had many specialists during her lifetime – infectious disease doctor when the dermatologist could no longer control the cellulitis, orthopedic docs, and others and was on many medications. I made my mind up, that I would go through this life with as few medicines and doctors as possible … I am going to keep babying my arm and remembering the woman around the corner who is our age and I am sure does not even know her name. That was such an experience to me … very scary and a classmate of mine has metastatic breast cancer now spread to 7 places on her body – she finally found the love of her life, a widower who lost his first wife to breast cancer. Life is shaky and scary sometimes.

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      • Yes, life can be shaky and scary. That’s why we need friends (and furry friends) to help us get through it! πŸ™‚ My mom was the same as yours. Did not want to go to the hospital, did not trust doctors, did not want to take pills or any medications. Hope you can get out for a walk tomorrow, Linda. Feed those squirrels an extra nut for me!

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      • Yes I saw too much of it with my mom – no one gave her clear answers, just “take these pills” … my poor mom was on so many pills. I refuse to do that – her pills had side effects. It was most likely Motrin did the number on her. I believe I will get out tomorrow and my boss is out in the morning, so I am going to shoot for 6 miles tomorrow … I did 5 today so that will leave me a mere 7 miles to make my goal. Now, I’m all hepped up to get it done one month early … you know all about goals. So hopefully this happens and I get it done for Friday. Now Friday morning may be dicey, so I have to get as much done before Thursday. It is good to have goals … and getting there ahead of time when I thought I might not make it makes me happy. I will indeed spoil the squirrels and extra from you. πŸ™‚

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      • I am happy about that – I’d have done it for sure if it had not rained all day Saturday. Going to push myself to get it done! Happy, yet a little crazy to now be obsessed about finishing in November – SMH!

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      • One last thing Laurie – on health things being scary. A former co-worker of mine has dogs, several of them, as she tracks her dogs and enters competitions for tracking. She has several Golden Retrievers and German Shepherds she uses for tracking and they are pets as well. Her nephew was visiting with his brand-new puppy, a Golden Retriever. She opened the door to greet him and one of her Goldens was excited to see Daniel and his puppy and tripped my friend Ilene. She fell over and down the two porch steps. She hit her head but said there was just a little bump but her ankle was twisted. In the middle of the night she woke up and wanted to go to the bathroom and put her foot down and felt pain in her ankle. She looked down and noticed it was swollen and bent over to feel if it was hot and slid off the bed. She fell onto the floor. Her niece just recently moved in with Ilene, who has been widowed for almost a decade. She heard the thump and went in – Ilene was out cold on the floor. She called an ambulance and she spent an entire day at the hospital. She has bleeding on the brain. I could not understand why she didn’t respond to my e-mail wishing her happy birthday. So that happened Saturday, she responded Sunday and said she still felt lightheaded and it it continued the doctor said she should return to the E.R. I’ve not heard from her since Sunday morning – she lives in Kingsville, Ontario. I just e-mailed her again – like me she has a flip phone with no internet. So, you never know what is going to happen to you – the dog trips you, you hurt your ankle, get a concussion from falling and hitting your head. I tell people with all the craziness going on in the world today, I hate to leave the world sometimes and here this happened in her own home.

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      • Oh my goodness! I hope you hear from your friend soon. That is a scary story! Yes, terrible things can happen right in our own home when we least expect it. Please let me know how Ilene is doing when you find out!

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      • Well, I just checked Laurie, after I finished a post and nothing from Ilene yet. I am positive that she was admitted again Sunday, because she usually e-mails daily, sometimes twice daily. She was in the E.R. all day Saturday, returned home very late at night, wrote me Sunday morning, then said she’d write again later. I’ve not heard since – I will let you know when I hear from her – thank you for asking about her.

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  10. I am so glad I found your blog. I look forward to your posts! My Christmases have been up and down. My in-laws died a month apart…one at Thanksgiving, and one at Christmas. I loved them dearly and miss them terribly. My mom died of cancer 30 years ago, and my dad died of old age 2011 at age 90. My kids are out of the house (except for my youngest who’s a basement rat) and I rarely get to see my other 4, even the one that lives in town. I began cooking for Thanksgiving and Christmas in JUNE, and canned and froze everything I needed so on the holiday, all we had to do was pour, heat, and eat. My kids used to cook with me. The oldest son helped with menus and time tables, and did breakfast breads and rolls and cheese balls. My oldest daughter was into baking rolls and pumpkin cheese cake, my youngest daughter loved cooking dinners, my middle son was the cookie expert, and my youngest son was the quick bread master. But I do most of this on my own now and I’m not inclined to put as much effort into it now. It’s less fun when the kids aren’t cooking with me.

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    • Thank you so much for your very kind comment, Rebecca. I am so sorry to hear about your in-laws. I have found, too that I miss cooking with my kids. For the most part, I am very happy as an empty-nester. My hubby and I married young, so I feel like this is our time to have some fun, socialize and travel a little bit. Two of our 3 kids live out of state, so we go to visit them. My youngest cooked Thanksgiving dinner this year. All I had to do was bring the pies. I kind of like not having the stress of a big production dinner.

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    • Thank you so much for your very kind comment, Nicole. Actually, I have to apologize. I had a more running-focused post ready to go. I linked the wrong one up on your link up. I hope you don’t mind!

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  11. It was such a relief to read about another person who greets Christmas with a major grump.

    There is something about losing our mothers that leaves a deep scar that never seems to heal fully. Although intellectually we know of its inevitability – especially as they advance in years and their health declines – but the impact of emotional wounds cannot be overestimated.

    I didn’t lose my mom at Christmas time, but I do remember her last Christmas. It was the first time she didn’t know who I was. Although I wasn’t surprised by it, it still hurt. Yes, when we’re wounded, our hard edges seem to get a little softer.

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  12. Thank you for sharing your story, Laurie! I agree, it’s often in the times of brokenness that God works in us and shapes our character. It’s not easy but it’s encouraging when we can look back and see how he has worked good in the hard times.

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  13. You most definitely have the right approach to this season – it can be so hard to get through this period. Christmas is so shrouded in mayhem, frenzy and sheer extravagance that I find it hard to enjoy sometimes too. We always try to focus on spending time together, enjoy the little things and try to give a bit back to those who need it. I hope you enjoy this holiday season in the way that is best for you x #dreamteam

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    • Thank you, Tracey. It is ironic isn’t it, that the time devoted to peace on earth is full of “mayhem, frenzy, and extravagance”? I will enjoy this holiday season – I have young grandchildren and they make Christmas fun.

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  14. Oh Laurie. I’m so sorry you had to go through this difficult time. I’m afraid your post gave me all the feels and tears. We’ve been through something a little bit like this and it’s so difficult (no matter what anyone says) to not look back and wonder if you had managed the situation differently. It sounds like you had a very special relationship with your mum – and memories to treasure forever. #dreamteam xx

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    • Thank you for your comment, Annette. I’m sorry you faced a similar situation. Mine was years ago, but it still leaves me a little bit wistful at this time of year. We always do second guess ourselves, don’t we? we do have wonderful memories!

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  15. Your post has truly touched me and I relate to it so much. In my mid thirties I had some very hard times emotionally and physically. Coming through all of it taught me a lot about myself and made me slow down in life. It was a valuable moment in my life. I didn’t think so at the time, of course!

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    • Thank you, Michelle. None of us get through life unscathed. We are all wounded in one way or another. You have a great attitude. To look at your hard times as a learning opportunity is inspiring!

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  16. This is beautiful, Laurie! Your story contains many elements that remind me of my own mom and caring for my parents as they got older. There are many parallels also in how Christmas was a blur every year. I am very intentional now in making this season what God wants it to be and not what others expect of me. Your words really hit home today.

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  17. Thank you for sharing your heart with us, Laurie. Your words have given me the encouragement (maybe permission?) I need to slow down this holiday season. May God’s love shine through me to help others see Him.
    Blessings to you for this wonderful post.
    Visiting today from Lori’s #MomentsofHope
    Marva | SunSparkleShine

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  18. Wow. Just Wow.

    I hope my ‘silence’ says more than the million words i would normally have typed ever could.

    Ephesians 4 was the perfect quote – it (thru you!) is speaking to me, and this time i might just listen? πŸ™‚

    Time to let the Love Light shine.

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      • Yeah – that is pretty difficult to swallow isn’t it??? πŸ˜‰

        Silence is ok when you are with another person, as our expression and body language, or just our ‘mood’ can be detected and hopefully understood…
        But on social media silence looks very much like indifference – and particularly in this case, i was anything but. πŸ™‚

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